FREE Civil Videos

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To Help You Make that Leap of Understanding.

Our Civil Instructors are passionate about teaching in addition to being very skilled in their field of expertise. They just love to see the light bulb go on when a student finally understands how to solve a problem.

That’s why they are offering Free Civil Videos – to help people make that leap of understanding. As they come across topics in the CERM and problems on the NCEES Practice Exam that need greater clarification beyond our DTC PE Exam Review, our civil instructors are creating these videos to help folks understand them better. They’ve also included samples of the video lessons you will find in our Civil PE Reviews.

“I passed the Civil PE exam on my first try and I attribute this to Dr. Tom’s Classroom for providing the best schedule, study material, and strategies and also introducing a great team of instructors. I would highly recommend his classes to anyone taking the PE exam.”

– Dadbeh Dowlatshahi, P.E., Houston, Texas

Instructional Companion Videos

NCEES CIVIL PE PRACTICE EXAM PROBLEMS

These videos address selected problems on the NCEES Practice Exams that have solutions that cause confusion with participants in our Civil Engineering PE Review Courses.

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource. https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

Problem 119 in the NCEES Civil AM Practice Exam is a classic Geotechnical question on gravity retaining wall stability, particularly overturning stability of the wall. It is critical that you be able to solve these types of classical retaining wall problems on the PE exam because you are almost certain to see them regardless of which discipline you select for the exam. This question will help you brush up on some basic geometry, statics, and will touch on very simple soil mechanics of lateral earth pressure, which is all you really need to know to solve retaining wall problems on the AM portion of the exam. However, you need to be efficient at solving these problems quickly even if it looks like they require several steps to get to the end result. Our instructional courses at Dr. Tom’s Classroom provide the most efficient way to get to the solution for common PE exam problems just like this one. Give this problem a try and watch the video to see if you understand all of the steps to get to the end result, good luck! – Mike Batten, PE – DTC Civil Geotechnical Instructor

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource.    https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

Problem 120 in the NCEES Civil Practice Exam for Water Resources & Environmental is like many on the exam, it gives you some extraneous information. You have to be careful to read the problem and use the correct depth of flow. It’s a two part problem where you begin by using the Manning equation for flow rate to determine the flow rate in the channel, then use that rate to determine the time to discharge the given runoff volume. Watch your units, and enjoy the video!  – Dr. Beth Sciaudone, PE – DTC Civil Water Resources & Environmental Instructor

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource.    https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

We’re reviewing Civil AM: Transportation Problem 128 in the NCEES Civil Practice Exams together because we typically solve vertical curve problems to find elevations along a curve (such as the elevation at a particular point or the high/low point). The key for this problem is to recall that taking a derivative of an equation will provide the slope, so by taking the derivative of the parabolic equation and using the given information, the slope at the given point can be determined. Give it a try, then watch the video. – Dr. Daniel Findley, PE – DTC Transportation Instructor

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource.    https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

We’re reviewing this problem together because this involves an evaluation of traffic count data in a way that is non-typical (a single day of traffic counts is used to represent a month). The key for this problem is to read and understand the problem clearly (the NCEES improved the wording of the problem through an errata). The problem is looking for a seasonal factor that can be used to multiply the Average Daily Traffic (ADT) to arrive at an estimate of the peak or seasonal daily traffic volume. – Dr. Daniel Findley, PE – DTC Transportation Instructor

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource.   https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

Problem 119 in the NCEES Civil AM Practice Exam is a classic Geotechnical question on gravity retaining wall stability, particularly overturning stability of the wall. It is critical that you be able to solve these types of classical retaining wall problems on the PE exam because you are almost certain to see them regardless of which discipline you select for the exam. This question will help you brush up on some basic geometry, statics, and will touch on very simple soil mechanics of lateral earth pressure, which is all you really need to know to solve retaining wall problems on the AM portion of the exam. However, you need to be efficient at solving these problems quickly even if it looks like they require several steps to get to the end result. Our instructional courses at Dr. Tom’s Classroom provide the most efficient way to get to the solution for common PE exam problems just like this one. Give this problem a try and watch the video to see if you understand all of the steps to get to the end result, good luck! – Mike Batten, PE – DTC Civil Geotechnical Instructor

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource.    https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

Problem 510 is found in the PM practice exam for Water Resources and Environmental—but don’t be afraid to try it if you are just taking the AM portion as it’s a great problem to practice open channel flow computations! – Dr. Beth Sciaudone, PE – DTC Civil Water Resources & Environmental Instructor

DTC recommends that anyone taking the PE Exam purchase the NCEES Practice Exam for the exam they are taking. It is an essential exam review resource.   https://account.ncees.org/exam-prep/

CIVIL PE EXAM – AM EXAM TOPICS

The goal of these videos is to address tricky concepts on the Civil Engineering PE Exams that are important to understand if you are taking one of those exams.

Often when we are using statics to determine internal or external forces and moments of a member, we’ll draw dummy forces and moments on our free body diagrams. In doing this, we tend to assume the forces are positive and then flip the direction of the force or moment on the final free body diagram if the value we calculated was negative. It is important to maintain a sign convention especially as we start to explore internal forces. Without a sign convention, you can quickly find yourself at odds as you start to draw shear and moment diagrams.

This video explains the typical sign convention used for beams in flexure. We’ll cover the sign convention for internal as well as external forces and moments. Then we’ll show how maintaining a sign convention can be used to help keep your shear and moment diagrams consistent.

– Shannon Warchol, PE – DTC Civil Structural Instructor

This video covers a core element of a roadway’s operation – level of service. The general topic of density is an Civil AM topic, while the application of density for measuring a freeway’s level of service spans into the Transportation PM area. Density, in terms of passenger cars in 1 mile of one lane of a freeway, is tied to the level of service that drivers experience – the higher the density of vehicles, the worse the level of service.

Dr. Daniel Findley, PE – DTC Civil Transportation Instructor

Understanding the information available in each view of a horizontal curve and how it relates to the key characteristics of horizontal alignment is critical in transportation engineering. In this short video, I use 3-D models to help show the three primary perspectives useful for horizontal alignment: • plan view • profile view • cross-section view. It really helps to see this in 3-D to understand the 2-D views you’ll be working with. I hope this video helps you understand the perspective seen in each type of view better.

Dr. Daniel Findley, PE – DTC Civil Transportation Instructor

The combination of horizontal and cross-sectional elements onto one image can be difficult to understand and interpret. In this video, we break down the key points of a horizontal curve and explain how and when the slope of the roadway changes to obtain the necessary cross slopes. Step-by-step, both the outside and inside edge of pavement elevations (relative to the centerline) are described.

Dr. Daniel Findley, PE DTC Civil Transportation Instructor

CIVIL PE EXAM – PM EXAM TOPICS

The goal of these videos is to address tricky concepts on the PM portions of the the Civil Engineering PE Exams that are important to understand if you are taking one of these Exams.

ACI 318-11 provides us with a quick method for determining forces and moments along a concrete frame, packing a bunch of equations into just a quarter page of text. The phrases and classifications can be confusing to keep track of, but Dr. Tom’s Classroom has you covered in this video. This video lays out an easy to follow flow chart for working through ACI 318-11’s Alternate to Frame Analysis. We’ll cover positive and negative moments as well as shear, discuss how the clear span length value changes depending on the value being calculated, and walk through the terminology in the section. This includes: end span, internal span, first internal span, spandrel, column, discontinuous end, unrestrained, integral, support, and face.

Shannon Warchol, PE – DTC Civil Structural Instructor

Sample lessons from DTC Civil PE EXAM REVIEWS

CIVIL AM EXAM - Sample lessons from DTC REVIEWS

These samples videos give you a look at what our Civil PE Exam Review lessons look like. Each DTC Civil Review covers all five civil engineering topics for the morning exam and then has in-depth lessons on the core topics for the afternoon exam. These lessons are for the morning exam.

“With DTC’s help, I finally passed the Civil PE exam after several previous attempts!  The organization of the course material helped me out tremendously.”

– PE, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

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